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Food insecurity is the lack of access, at times, to enough food to meet all household members’ nutritional needs. And it’s often invisible to those who aren’t experiencing it. You may never know that one of your employees is skipping meals at home because he/she lacks the money or resources to maintain an adequate diet every day.

Since their inception in the 1970s, EAPs have expanded their services to meet the needs of today’s workforce, including providing support for marital/family issues, work stress, and legal counseling. As effective as EAPs can be in solving some of the problems employees face, employers are partnering with WorkLife to complement and enhance their traditional benefits for these five key reasons….

asking for help - why it's hard for your employees

It’s critical your workforce gets support when they encounter tough life challenges. But, it’s not always easy for your employees to ask for help.

Overwhelmed. Burned-out. Exhausted. No matter how you say it, American workers are stressed. In the last six months, 60% of WorkLife clients reported that their stress levels negatively impacted their work and home lives. According to the American Psychological Association, the high cost of living and healthcare expenses are to blame for American’s rising stress levels—with 72% of adults feeling stressed about money at least some of the time.

More than 40% of Americans can’t afford to cover an emergency expense of $400 or more. And for those who are just getting by, one financial setback can set off a snowball effect, causing challenges that grow in severity as they goes unresolved. When employees reach out to WorkLife Partnership, it’s rarely because they’re facing just one barrier. In fact, the average WorkLife client reports experiencing six or more barriers at once. When one challenge turns into two and two into three, your employees could find themselves up against issues that are insurmountable—unless they have support.

When I moved to Colorado to start a new job, I knew that I would have the same salary, but the cost of living was 200% what I was accustomed to in Kansas City. I also owed significant debt to the IRS due to an error. I was having a hard time digging out from this tax debt, and I was scared about how I was going to make things work financially in Colorado. On top of that, I ultimately wanted to get into a place of my own since the cost of real estate was skyrocketing.

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