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Tensed male nurse leaning on wall in corridor

COVID-19 and its complications will hit frontline workers the hardest. It’s difficult enough in normal times when an employee comes to you struggling with something in their lives that you have no resources to address. What do you do when every one of your employees is suddenly anxious and overwhelmed with the same mounting crisis?

Medical Debt

“I’ve stopped checking my mail,” said Travis, overwhelmed by the past-due medical bills and collections notices piling up in his mailbox. Unfortunately, Travis’ situation is all too familiar. It seems like every week another family is in the news, sharing their story about unexpected medical bills, unaffordable healthcare costs, or being so burdened by medical debt that they have to file for bankruptcy. These stories aren’t anomalies; they’re very much a reflection of reality.

Food insecurity is the lack of access, at times, to enough food to meet all household members’ nutritional needs. And it’s often invisible to those who aren’t experiencing it. You may never know that one of your employees is skipping meals at home because he/she lacks the money or resources to maintain an adequate diet every day.

Since their inception in the 1970s, EAPs have expanded their services to meet the needs of today’s workforce, including providing support for marital/family issues, work stress, and legal counseling. As effective as EAPs can be in solving some of the problems employees face, employers are partnering with WorkLife to complement and enhance their traditional benefits for these five key reasons….

asking for help - why it's hard for your employees

It’s critical your workforce gets support when they encounter tough life challenges. But, it’s not always easy for your employees to ask for help.

Overwhelmed. Burned-out. Exhausted. No matter how you say it, American workers are stressed. In the last six months, 60% of WorkLife clients reported that their stress levels negatively impacted their work and home lives. According to the American Psychological Association, the high cost of living and healthcare expenses are to blame for American’s rising stress levels—with 72% of adults feeling stressed about money at least some of the time.

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